[William Blake] » The Complete Poems [china PDF] Read Online Ñ treatmentinlithuania.co.uk

[William Blake] » The Complete Poems [china PDF] Read Online Ñ It was a required reading at English poetry seminar in college I haven t read all the poems of course, but I highly enjoyed the ones I have.
Have just completed Jerusalem , Milton , The book of Thel the prophetic books I ve been reading and returning to Blake since the mid 1980s and collect prints of the facsimiles when I can get them This is my first time to get through the books mentioned above.
They remind me a lot of Tolkien s project Blake and Tolkien both where English men who created their own mythologies about England Both were religious Both made paintings of their imaginative worlds The difference is that Tolkien was a practicing Catholic, who was not messing with the doctrines of his faith Blake was kind of scary He is highly critical of the deism of his time He states that forgiveness is the primary characteristic of a person who follows Jesus He was critical of a society that trammels over the well being of the weak for industry and profit What makes him scary It is difficult to understand what he is attempting to do with his portraits of the giants that comprise Albion Britain I am still not certain if his portrait of Satan is supposed to be a necessary and therefore good force that is a part of the dualism of reality, or if he actually is evil Whatever he is saying I wouldn t want those words to have come from me.
The character of Satan is a master of extreme heat and cold, very much like Tolkien s Morgoth They both stir things up in much the same way against the work of the rest of the gods.
Also, striking to me is that Blake uses the word Ork to discribe one of his characters, the only other places I have seen this is Tolkien s Orcs and a mention in Beowulf.
I m not suggesting an influence I have no idea what influenced Tolkien I am merely pointing out that these two writers both poets achieved bodies of writing that did many of the same things Tolkien was able to craft his mythology into complete story and novelistic presentations as we see in the Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings Ultimately, the two writers developed in different ways I, at least enjoy seeing the products of each writer to see how they use the medium of myth creation to explore the world of their times and to critic and respond to the world.
This felt like visiting an old friend, as I ve read quite a bit of Blakes poetry before Still love it.
A small collection of poems from 18th century Englishman William Blake Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, and viewed in some quarters as a madman, it wasn t until later his work was regarded as grand Along with his paintings, he would be part of the Romantic Movement , and was also strongly influenced by the Church, politics and historical revolutions Made up of the Songs of Innocence Experience , arguably his most famous work, they are charming poems, with the early ones that had me thinking of the British countryside on a summers day, sitting under a tree and looking yonder at the picturesque landscape.
Sometimes it s the small and simple things that lead to much beauty, and like other easy on the eye poets, most are a joy to read, and so full of wonder My favorites were Holy Thursday , Divine Image and The Garden of Love A little Taste, The Lily The modest Rose puts forth a thorn,The humble sheep a threat ning horn While the lily white shall in love delight,Nor a thorn nor a threat stain her beauty bright It was a required reading at English poetry seminar in college I haven t read all the poems of course, but I highly enjoyed the ones I have.
Have just completed Jerusalem , Milton , The book of Thel the prophetic books I ve been reading and returning to Blake since the mid 1980s and collect prints of the facsimiles when I can get them This is my first time to get through the books mentioned above.
They remind me a lot of Tolkien s project Blake and Tolkien both where English men who created their own mythologies about England Both were religious Both made paintings of their imaginative worlds The difference is that Tolkien was a practicing Catholic, who was not messing with the doctrines of his faith Blake was kind of scary He is highly critical of the deism of his time He states that forgiveness is the primary characteristic of a person who follows Jesus He was critical of a society that trammels over the well being of the weak for industry and profit What makes him scary It is difficult to understand what he is attempting to do with his portraits of the giants that comprise Albion Britain I am still not certain if his portrait of Satan is supposed to be a necessary and therefore good force that is a part of the dualism of reality, or if he actually is evil Whatever he is saying I wouldn t want those words to have come from me.
The character of Satan is a master of extreme heat and cold, very much like Tolkien s Morgoth They both stir things up in much the same way against the work of the rest of the gods.
Also, striking to me is that Blake uses the word Ork to discribe one of his characters, the only other places I have seen this is Tolkien s Orcs and a mention in Beowulf.
I m not suggesting an influence I have no idea what influenced Tolkien I am merely pointing out that these two writers both poets achieved bodies of writing that did many of the same things Tolkien was able to craft his mythology into complete story and novelistic presentations as we see in the Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings Ultimately, the two writers developed in different ways I, at least enjoy seeing the products of each writer to see how they use the medium of myth creation to explore the world of their times and to critic and respond to the world.
This felt like visiting an old friend, as I ve read quite a bit of Blakes poetry before Still love it.
A small collection of poems from 18th century Englishman William Blake Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, and viewed in some quarters as a madman, it wasn t until later his work was regarded as grand Along with his paintings, he would be part of the Romantic Movement , and was also strongly influenced by the Church, politics and historical revolutions Made up of the Songs of Innocence Experience , arguably his most famous work, they are charming poems, with the early ones that had me thinking of the British countryside on a summers day, sitting under a tree and looking yonder at the picturesque landscape.
Sometimes it s the small and simple things that lead to much beauty, and like other easy on the eye poets, most are a joy to read, and so full of wonder My favorites were Holy Thursday , Divine Image and The Garden of Love A little Taste, The Lily The modest Rose puts forth a thorn,The humble sheep a threat ning horn While the lily white shall in love delight,Nor a thorn nor a threat stain her beauty bright Some of the poems were a tad confusing at first, but after a second look became clearer They all have very deliberate word choices and are quite well written An enjoyable collection of his poems.
Introduction Here is a selection, a bit of Blake, designed as a bedside companion or to accompany a walk in the countryside, to sit beneath a shady tree and discover a portal into his visionary and musical experience.
Although much of his work seems impenetrable he never ceased in his desire to connect with the populace He has succeeded in offering both He has been the spiritual ancestor of generations of poets and alchemical detectives seeking their way through the labyrinth of inhuman knowledge even as schoolchildren recite his verses His proverbs have become common parlance To the evening star.
.
Smile on our loves, and while thou drawest the Blue curtains of the sky, scatter thy silver dew On every flower that shuts its sweet eyes In timely sleep Let thy west wind sleep on The lake speak silence with thy glimmering eyes, And wash the dusk with silver.
One Of The Great English Romantic Poets, William Blake Was An Artist, Poet, Mystic And Visionary His Work Ranges From The Deceptively Simple And Lyrical Songs Of Innocence And Their Counterpoint Experience Which Juxtapose Poems Such As The Lamb And The Tyger , And The Blossom And The Sick Rose To Highly Elaborate, Apocalyptic Works, Such As The Four Zoas, Milton And Jerusalem Throughout His Life Blake Drew On A Rich Heritage Of Philosophy, Religion And Myth, To Create A Poetic Worlds Illuminated By His Spiritual And Revolutionary Beliefs That Have Fascinated, Intrigued And Enchanted Readers For Generations Really loved this book, there were quite a few poems in it that I wasn t huge on, but overall this was just a really great book.
Blake focuses on religion a bit to much for my taste I do like The Tyger, but that might be from reciting it in grade school, and it being the only poem that was familiar.
THE DARKNESS OF THIS LIGHT IS AN APOCALYPSEThe English Language and English Literature have two visionary geniuses, William Shakespeare and William Blake They are equal because different and they are both great because they see beyond words and beyond the surface of things, though with different means at times And American English Literature has a third one, Walt Whitman Three pillars of English visionary mythology that make any other mythology, Christian, Jewish, Islamic, Hindu or Buddhist very small indeed They can only compare with Maya mythology that enters a completely different though just as intense universe of fantastic and at times horrific, cosmic power and life William Blake is a poetic monument created by human surrealist nature He refers to himself and his own roots exclusively though he has nourished his imagination with the visions of others and, first of all, of all Apocalypses ever written or simply imagined by anyone since the mutating birth of Homo Sapiens Blake wants to assume that human history, but he tries to go beyond all categories our Indo European languages impose onto our thinking For him time is timeless and becomes pure duration, space is spaceless and becomes a pure and permanent reversal of the inside outside and of the outside inside He vertically aligns three cardinal points North, South, and East, and makes West turn around this North South East axis delimiting a spindle that becomes a vision of our life, soul, mind, and flesh We are that rotating spindle that collapses inwards permanently and swells outwards again incessantly and infinitely And even if we really are that spindle in every one of ourselves, the whole universe is a spindle of all the human spindles on its own and all by itself The whole universe is flesh, the whole universe is divine, the whole universe is satanic, the whole universe is the promise of salvation in that very Brownian chaos of our dreaming imagination that encompasses all these movements and tries to rebuild some epiphanic salvation in that seemingly incoherent apocalypse And that salvation is visual, a vision in color, shapes, and forms, movements and drifts and the use of illuminations and graphic representations are just the shapings of this inner mentally graphic meaning.
These various dimensions are intertwined in, for example, Jerusalem, The Emanation of the Giant Albion the dramatic line single or multi linear, if we follow the debate dominated by David Whitmarsh , the style and the music, the imagery and the menagerie, the religious inspiration and the iconoclastic anti references, and of course the illustrations Blake gives the lie to George Lakoff when this latter says, Metaphor is a natural phenomenon since conceptual metaphor is part of human thought, and linguistic metaphor is part of human language LAKOFF, G JOHNSON, M Metaphors We Live By The University of Chicago Press, 2003 1980 , p.
247 For Blake it is all a mental graphic multidimensional semiotic hybridization, and thus has nothing to do with the natural of natural phenomena In fact, we can wonder if Lakoff does not take natural with the meaning of human produced because human thought and human language have been devised by Homo Sapiens in his long emergence from his Hominin ancestors Nothing natural there but only phylogenic development of the mind and language that developed pre Sapiens Hominins into Sapiens Hominins.
To capture this art you must concentrate on some sections, even short excerpts, probably one or two plates to be able to see in full detail how this poetry tries to recreate the Hebraic Semitic capture of the world and conceptualization of life, I mean the Semitic vision of the world with a language that only starts from consonantal roots and then conceptualizes a whole network of notions derived from these roots by the use of vocalic variations, the roots keeping there meaning no matter how far from them the discursive words are built with such vocalic variations and compositions of such roots and derived discursive words But Blake works in a language that is two phylogenic articulations further down our phylogenic evolution, a synthetic analytical language Blake is a typical English poet who knows those ancient and ancestral languages enough to try to transport their conceptualizing power into English itself His prophetic texts are the visual and graphic results of that attempt.
But to really understand Blake you also need to take into account the simple, short poems like the famous Tyger poem Tyger Tyger, burning bright, In the forests of the night What immortal hand or eye, Could frame thy fearful symmetry And these simple poems have been a phenomenal inspiration to many artists in England but also in the world I will only take one example, Benjamin Britten and his opera The Little Sweep It starts from two poems by William Blake, the Chimney Sweeper, one in the Songs of Innocence 1789 and the other in the Songs of Experience 1794 The two poems have contradictory meanings on the basis of the same description of a hateful and bleak occupation for boys under ten The first poem s conclusion is Though the morning was cold, Tom was happy and warm So if all do their duty they need not fear harm Good boy indeed who knows his duty The second poem s conclusion is And because I am happy and dance and sing,They think they have done me no injury,And are gone to praise God and his priest and king,Who make up a heaven of our misery This chimney sweeper shows some kind of childish happiness that hides well the real bleak misery inside If we keep in mind this contradictory message from the most empathetic English poet ever, we can then get into the opera whose libretto was written by Eric Crozier In that opera, Benjamin Britten plays on the strong image of Blake s first poem of these boys being locked up in black coffins of soot and their being freed by an angel That thousands of sweepers, Dick, Joe, Ned, and Jack,Were all of them locked up in coffins of black.
And by came an angel who had a bright key,And he opened the coffins and set them all free Then down a green plain leaping, laughing, they run,And wash in a river, and shine in the sun.
Then naked and white, all their bags left behind,They rise upon clouds and sport in the wind Benjamin Britten, or Eric Crozier, uses the image of the coffins many times stuck in the chimney, then hidden in the toy cupboard, spending the night there, and finally being moved out of the house and onto his liberation in a traveling chest Every time the boy is liberated in a way or another, the last time is a promise though, by the children of the house who plot that whole procedure, hence playing the role of the angel and led into that by three girls along with three boys, a perfect David s star, from two families, the Brooks two girls and one boy and the Cromes two boys and one girl , one triangle point up representing the light of divine truth poured down into the human cup and one triangle point down representing the human cup receiving the divine light So, enjoy Blake s poetry and try to enjoy itthan just read it Contemplate, empathize and visualize in your mind s eye that poignant reality, that cruel suffering in Blake s vision and you might be engulfed in a power that has been running from 300,000 years ago when Homo Sapiens emerged from Homo Erectus or Homo Ergaster in Black Africa to today when the whole humanity and the planet itself are on the verge of going through the sixth mass extinction of life, and this time due to over population, over exploitation of natural resources and extreme over pollution.
Dr Jacques COULARDEAU

Introduction Here is a selection, a bit of Blake, designed as a bedside companion or to accompany a walk in the countryside, to sit beneath a shady tree and discover a portal into his visionary and musical experience.
Although much of his work seems impenetrable he never ceased in his desire to connect with the populace He has succeeded in offering both He has been the spiritual ancestor of generations of poets and alchemical detectives seeking their way through the labyrinth of inhuman knowledge even as schoolchildren recite his verses His proverbs have become common parlance To the evening star.
.
Smile on our loves, and while thou drawest the Blue curtains of the sky, scatter thy silver dew On every flower that shuts its sweet eyes In timely sleep Let thy west wind sleep on The lake speak silence with thy glimmering eyes, And wash the dusk with silver.
Some of the poems were a tad confusing at first, but after a second look became clearer They all have very deliberate word choices and are quite well written An enjoyable collection of his poems.
Really loved this book, there were quite a few poems in it that I wasn t huge on, but overall this was just a really great book.
Blake focuses on religion a bit to much for my taste I do like The Tyger, but that might be from reciting it in grade school, and it being the only poem that was familiar.
THE DARKNESS OF THIS LIGHT IS AN APOCALYPSEThe English Language and English Literature have two visionary geniuses, William Shakespeare and William Blake They are equal because different and they are both great because they see beyond words and beyond the surface of things, though with different means at times And American English Literature has a third one, Walt Whitman Three pillars of English visionary mythology that make any other mythology, Christian, Jewish, Islamic, Hindu or Buddhist very small indeed They can only compare with Maya mythology that enters a completely different though just as intense universe of fantastic and at times horrific, cosmic power and life William Blake is a poetic monument created by human surrealist nature He refers to himself and his own roots exclusively though he has nourished his imagination with the visions of others and, first of all, of all Apocalypses ever written or simply imagined by anyone since the mutating birth of Homo Sapiens Blake wants to assume that human history, but he tries to go beyond all categories our Indo European languages impose onto our thinking For him time is timeless and becomes pure duration, space is spaceless and becomes a pure and permanent reversal of the inside outside and of the outside inside He vertically aligns three cardinal points North, South, and East, and makes West turn around this North South East axis delimiting a spindle that becomes a vision of our life, soul, mind, and flesh We are that rotating spindle that collapses inwards permanently and swells outwards again incessantly and infinitely And even if we really are that spindle in every one of ourselves, the whole universe is a spindle of all the human spindles on its own and all by itself The whole universe is flesh, the whole universe is divine, the whole universe is satanic, the whole universe is the promise of salvation in that very Brownian chaos of our dreaming imagination that encompasses all these movements and tries to rebuild some epiphanic salvation in that seemingly incoherent apocalypse And that salvation is visual, a vision in color, shapes, and forms, movements and drifts and the use of illuminations and graphic representations are just the shapings of this inner mentally graphic meaning.
These various dimensions are intertwined in, for example, Jerusalem, The Emanation of the Giant Albion the dramatic line single or multi linear, if we follow the debate dominated by David Whitmarsh , the style and the music, the imagery and the menagerie, the religious inspiration and the iconoclastic anti references, and of course the illustrations Blake gives the lie to George Lakoff when this latter says, Metaphor is a natural phenomenon since conceptual metaphor is part of human thought, and linguistic metaphor is part of human language LAKOFF, G JOHNSON, M Metaphors We Live By The University of Chicago Press, 2003 1980 , p.
247 For Blake it is all a mental graphic multidimensional semiotic hybridization, and thus has nothing to do with the natural of natural phenomena In fact, we can wonder if Lakoff does not take natural with the meaning of human produced because human thought and human language have been devised by Homo Sapiens in his long emergence from his Hominin ancestors Nothing natural there but only phylogenic development of the mind and language that developed pre Sapiens Hominins into Sapiens Hominins.
To capture this art you must concentrate on some sections, even short excerpts, probably one or two plates to be able to see in full detail how this poetry tries to recreate the Hebraic Semitic capture of the world and conceptualization of life, I mean the Semitic vision of the world with a language that only starts from consonantal roots and then conceptualizes a whole network of notions derived from these roots by the use of vocalic variations, the roots keeping there meaning no matter how far from them the discursive words are built with such vocalic variations and compositions of such roots and derived discursive words But Blake works in a language that is two phylogenic articulations further down our phylogenic evolution, a synthetic analytical language Blake is a typical English poet who knows those ancient and ancestral languages enough to try to transport their conceptualizing power into English itself His prophetic texts are the visual and graphic results of that attempt.
But to really understand Blake you also need to take into account the simple, short poems like the famous Tyger poem Tyger Tyger, burning bright, In the forests of the night What immortal hand or eye, Could frame thy fearful symmetry And these simple poems have been a phenomenal inspiration to many artists in England but also in the world I will only take one example, Benjamin Britten and his opera The Little Sweep It starts from two poems by William Blake, the Chimney Sweeper, one in the Songs of Innocence 1789 and the other in the Songs of Experience 1794 The two poems have contradictory meanings on the basis of the same description of a hateful and bleak occupation for boys under ten The first poem s conclusion is Though the morning was cold, Tom was happy and warm So if all do their duty they need not fear harm Good boy indeed who knows his duty The second poem s conclusion is And because I am happy and dance and sing,They think they have done me no injury,And are gone to praise God and his priest and king,Who make up a heaven of our misery This chimney sweeper shows some kind of childish happiness that hides well the real bleak misery inside If we keep in mind this contradictory message from the most empathetic English poet ever, we can then get into the opera whose libretto was written by Eric Crozier In that opera, Benjamin Britten plays on the strong image of Blake s first poem of these boys being locked up in black coffins of soot and their being freed by an angel That thousands of sweepers, Dick, Joe, Ned, and Jack,Were all of them locked up in coffins of black.
And by came an angel who had a bright key,And he opened the coffins and set them all free Then down a green plain leaping, laughing, they run,And wash in a river, and shine in the sun.
Then naked and white, all their bags left behind,They rise upon clouds and sport in the wind Benjamin Britten, or Eric Crozier, uses the image of the coffins many times stuck in the chimney, then hidden in the toy cupboard, spending the night there, and finally being moved out of the house and onto his liberation in a traveling chest Every time the boy is liberated in a way or another, the last time is a promise though, by the children of the house who plot that whole procedure, hence playing the role of the angel and led into that by three girls along with three boys, a perfect David s star, from two families, the Brooks two girls and one boy and the Cromes two boys and one girl , one triangle point up representing the light of divine truth poured down into the human cup and one triangle point down representing the human cup receiving the divine light So, enjoy Blake s poetry and try to enjoy itthan just read it Contemplate, empathize and visualize in your mind s eye that poignant reality, that cruel suffering in Blake s vision and you might be engulfed in a power that has been running from 300,000 years ago when Homo Sapiens emerged from Homo Erectus or Homo Ergaster in Black Africa to today when the whole humanity and the planet itself are on the verge of going through the sixth mass extinction of life, and this time due to over population, over exploitation of natural resources and extreme over pollution.
Dr Jacques COULARDEAU