ê The Poetry of Pablo Neruda Á Download by ↠´ Pablo Neruda

ê The Poetry of Pablo Neruda Á Download by ↠´ Pablo Neruda The sad wind goes on slaughtering butterflies The word butterfly is such a beautiful word in almost all the languages I know In Spanish mariposa , French papillon , Danish sommerfugl and Swedish fj ril Only in Germany could they call it Schmetterling and then on top of it give the name to a fighter plane LOVE HIMan excerpt from my favorite poemI no longer love her, that s certain, but how I loved her.
My voice tried to find the wind to touch her hearing.
Another s She will be another s Like my kisses before.
Her voice Her bright body Her inifinite eyes.
I no longer love her, that s certain, but maybe I love her Love is so short, forgetting is so long.
Because through nights like this one I held her in my armsmy soul is not satisfied that it has lost her.
The Most Comprehensive English Language Collection Of Work Ever By The Greatest Poet Of The Twentieth Century In Any Language Gabriel Garc A M Rquez In His Work A Continent Awakens To Consciousness So Wrote The Swedish Academy In Awarding The Nobel Prize To Pablo Neruda, The Author Of Than Thirty Five books Of Poetry And One Of Latin America S Most Revered Writers, Lionized During His Lifetime As The People S Poet This Selection Of Neruda S Poetry, The Most Comprehensive Single Volume Available In English, Presents Nearly Six Hundred Poems Scores Of Them Are In New And Sometimes Multiple Translations, And Many Accompanied By The Spanish original In His Introduction, Ilan Stavans Situates Neruda In His Native Milieu As Well As In A Contemporary English Language One, And A Group Of New Translations By Leading Poets Testifies To Neruda S Enduring, Vibrant Legacy Among English Speaking Writers And Readers Today breathtaking, heart wrenching, soul awakening Neruda is love I do not love you as if you were salt rose, or topaz,or the arrow of carnations the fire shoots off.
I love you as certain dark things are to be loved,in secret, between the shadow and the soul.
I love you as the plant that never bloomsbut carries in itself the light of hidden flowers thanks to your love a certain solid fragrance,risen from the earth, lives darkly in my body.
I love you without knowing how, or when, or from where.
I love you straightforwardly, without complexities or pride so I love you because I know no other waythan this where I does not exist, nor you,so close that your hand on my chest is my hand,so close that your eyes close as I fall asleep.
I have loved Pablo Neruda since I was fifteen years old and have fell in love with his beautiful expressions countless times I believe his raw passion speaks to all of us on a universal level It s so human and bare, it is his monument left to us This is an amazing collection which begins with his early work to his retrospective years, it shows you this amazing evolution of his writing and how powerful it becomes.
I Liked Pablo Neruda s writing, I believe his raw passion speaks to all of us on a universal level It s so human and bare, it is his monument left to us This is an amazing collection which begins with his early work to his retrospective years, it shows you this amazing evolution of his writing and how powerful it becomes Some poems really hit home where some of them really confused me These poems really made this book a quite interesting read for me And I in these lines say Like this I want you, love,love, Like this I love you,as you dressand how your hair lifts upand how your mouth smiles,light as the waterof the spring upon the pure stones,Like this I love you, beloved Pablo Neruda I no longer love her, that s certain, but how I loved her.
My voice tried to find the wind to touch her hearing.
Another s She will be another s Like my kisses before.
Her voice Her bright body Her inifinite eyes.
I no longer love her, that s certain, but maybe I love her Love is so short, forgetting is so long.
Because through nights like this one I held her in my armsmy soul is not satisfied that it has lost her.
I will bring you happy flowers from the mountains, bluebells, dark hazels, and rustic baskets of kisses I want to do with you what spring does with the cherry treesYou discoveredHis thoughts, His words, his love, His passionate IntensityIn a tiny bookThat s nowWell fingered.
Then you added your ownUnique voice, your armsYour legs, your body And your love,So that in turn You might be lovedAnd you wereAnd still, my heart, Again, you are.
This is definitely my first book of Pablo s but not the last I am looking forward to his writing Highly Recommended to poetry Classic Lovers.
I m not big on poetry I ve read the classics Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, etc I ve read the epic poems Iliad, Odyssey, Gilgamesh But modern era poetry usually leaves me cold too much angst and unrequited love However, I am always left floored by Neruda Ode to Common Things got me into Neruda and remains one of my all time favorites He is mostly famous for his love poems and, while they are extraordinary, they are not IMHO his best Neruda sees the epic and timeless connections inwellin everything Spoons and salt shakers are the common man s connection with history and heaven Love and life and death are found in unexpected places I just received this volume of his poetry which covers most of his work, some of which I ve read and some which I will certainly read over and over again I wish I was fluent in Spanish so I could read this in the original as I have no doubt something is lost in the translation Buty what is not lost is priceless.
This book is the quintessential poetry book Neruda is untouchable and this compilation is the best If my house was burning and I could only run out with one book it would be a close call between this and Lorca s compilation You could be stranded on a desert island with this book for the rest of your life and you would have a smile on your face Y ahora, pido silencio.


And because love battlesnot only in its burning agriculturesbut also in the mouth of men and women,I will finish off by taking the path awayto those who between my chest and your fragrancewant to interpose their obscure plant.
About me, nothing worsethey will tell you, my love,than what I told you.
I lived in the prairiesbefore I got to know youand I did not wait love but I waslaying in wait for and I jumped on the rose.
Whatcan they tell you I am neither good nor bad but a man,and they will then associate the dangerof my life, which you knowand which with your passion you shared.
And good, this dangeris danger of love, of complete lovefor all life,for all lives,and if this love brings usthe death and the prisons,I am sure that your big eyes,as when I kiss them,will then close with pride,into double pride, love,with your pride and my pride.
But to my ears they will come beforeto wear down the tourof the sweet and hard love which binds us,and they will say The oneyou love,is not a woman for you,Why do you love her I thinkyou could find onebeautiful, serious,deep, other, you understand me, look how she s light,and what a head she has,and look at how she dresses,and etcetera and etcetera.
And I in these lines say Like this I want you, love,love, Like this I love you,as you dressand how your hair lifts upand how your mouth smiles,light as the waterof the spring upon the pure stones,Like this I love you, beloved Pablo Neruda Neruda knew how to love a woman There s such a sensuous, tactile quality to his poetry that makes you think he just might have been one hell of a lover And mixed in with this earthy prose is an appreciation for the subtle, fleeting moments that last only in quick impressions and memories of wanting and desire In one moment he tells us of the heavy weight and feel as he cups the rounded breasts of his mistress and the next he sighs his longing for the ability to devour the parts of her that linger in his memory whole Truly the love poet for the modern age I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair Silent, starving I prowl through the streets Bread does not nourish me, dawn disquiets me, I search the liquid sound of your steps all day I hunger for your sleek laugh, For your hands the color of the wild grain, I hunger for the pale stones of your fingernails, I want to eat your skin like a whole almond I want to eat the sunbeam flaring in your loveliness, The nose, sovereign of your arrogant face, I want to eat the fleeting shade of your lashes, And I walk hungry, smelling the twilight Looking for you, for your hot heart, Like a puma in the barren wilderness.
One thing I will say about this particular copy though is that while it is certainly the most comprehensive edition available to English speakers, it is not, perhaps, the best translated Kudos to the editors for managing to put it all together though and I do believe credit is due for not sticking to one translator for the whole thing However when comparing certain works against others it becomes apparent that not all translators do their transcribing equally Oh well, I suppose you have to go with what s available to you at the time Obviously not all my favorites have done every single poem and I do appreciate the effort to use the superior translation when available.