✓ Read ✓ Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution by Steven Levy ¶ treatmentinlithuania.co.uk

✓ Read ✓ Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution by Steven Levy ¶ Why didn t O Reilly bother to edit out the unneeded phrases like known to man the best computer in the world known to man A decent editor could have cut 20% out of this book, and made it much better in the process.
Additionally, there are enough cases of deep confusion about technical terms and famous events that I had to research any stories I was not already familiar with to see if the details were correct.
The writing is terrible, punctuated with ridiculous narrative commentary For instance, while discussing a chess program that avoided a loss via an illegal move, Levy asks if the program was finding a new solution to chess No it had a bug that caused it to consider illegal moves, and it took one It s hard to imagine confusing one bug that causes program to take illegal moves with the other sentient program that changes the rules of chess for increased enjoyment It s also hard to imagine a good editor failing to flag such an ignorant statement.
I have the 25th anniversary edition and, to be fair, the portions of the book added later when Levy was older and experienced are better written But that only shows how poor a job the original editor did I can understand Dennis Ritchie s anti foreword to the UNIX Hater s Handbook Like excrement, it contains enough undigested nuggets of nutrition to sustain life for some But it is not a tasty pie Bon appetit I loved this book It is a documentary about various aspects of computing The first part is utterly excellent It is about the birth of the hacker ethic around the DEC PDP machine in the MIT AI Lab It is very funny and very inspiring Some of the people in that section of the book have disappeared into obscurity, so the book is amazing for capturing this lost part of tech history The second part is about the personal computer revolution It covers the Altair machine, the Apple I II and other microcomputers of its class This part made me realise for the first time how much of a key player Apple were at the beginning They pretty much created the home computer The third part is about games, and the programmers and companies that created them for the early computers It focuses on a few key developers and companies, mostly Sierra This was quite interesting since I played a lot of Sierra games back in the day and didn t know any of these background stories until now Anyone really into programming should get a kick out of the first section, it is worth buying just for this.
This book, the original version, changed my life when I read it in high school It, along with The Cuckoo s Egg , put me on the road to computer science in college.
Great book John Carmack said it was the most inspiring book for him and I can understand why.
The word Hackers is not the same these days, but the Hacker Ethics still lives in some of the programmers out there Those guys that keep hacking and or programming for hours and hours just for the joy of create and modify things still exists.
It made me think about the old times when I used to use part of my sleep time to work on some C SDL code just to understand how could I bring 2D game to life with these tools This book and these old hackers motivated me to bring my hacker lifestyle again It s time to get back.
Why didn t O Reilly bother to edit out the unneeded phrases like known to man the best computer in the world known to man A decent editor could have cut 20% out of this book, and made it much better in the process.
Additionally, there are enough cases of deep confusion about technical terms and famous events that I had to research any stories I was not already familiar with to see if the details were correct.
The writing is terrible, punctuated with ridiculous narrative commentary For instance, while discussing a chess program that avoided a loss via an illegal move, Levy asks if the program was finding a new solution to chess No it had a bug that caused it to consider illegal moves, and it took one It s hard to imagine confusing one bug that causes program to take illegal moves with the other sentient program that changes the rules of chess for increased enjoyment It s also hard to imagine a good editor failing to flag such an ignorant statement.
I have the 25th anniversary edition and, to be fair, the portions of the book added later when Levy was older and experienced are better written But that only shows how poor a job the original editor did I can understand Dennis Ritchie s anti foreword to the UNIX Hater s Handbook Like excrement, it contains enough undigested nuggets of nutrition to sustain life for some But it is not a tasty pie Bon appetit I loved this book It is a documentary about various aspects of computing The first part is utterly excellent It is about the birth of the hacker ethic around the DEC PDP machine in the MIT AI Lab It is very funny and very inspiring Some of the people in that section of the book have disappeared into obscurity, so the book is amazing for capturing this lost part of tech history The second part is about the personal computer revolution It covers the Altair machine, the Apple I II and other microcomputers of its class This part made me realise for the first time how much of a key player Apple were at the beginning They pretty much created the home computer The third part is about games, and the programmers and companies that created them for the early computers It focuses on a few key developers and companies, mostly Sierra This was quite interesting since I played a lot of Sierra games back in the day and didn t know any of these background stories until now Anyone really into programming should get a kick out of the first section, it is worth buying just for this.
This book, the original version, changed my life when I read it in high school It, along with The Cuckoo s Egg , put me on the road to computer science in college.
Great book John Carmack said it was the most inspiring book for him and I can understand why.
The word Hackers is not the same these days, but the Hacker Ethics still lives in some of the programmers out there Those guys that keep hacking and or programming for hours and hours just for the joy of create and modify things still exists.
It made me think about the old times when I used to use part of my sleep time to work on some C SDL code just to understand how could I bring 2D game to life with these tools This book and these old hackers motivated me to bring my hacker lifestyle again It s time to get back.
This was a really interesting look at the history of computers as a DIY technology, stretching from the 1950s to the 1980s, when the first edition of it was published I find a lot of computer users look at the things like they re magic boxes, likely run by black magic and or hamsters running in wheels I confess to having moments where I ve felt that way myself, but I m trying to educate myself a bit on how computers actually think and operate, and this book helped cement that understanding a bit.
Additionally, this book reinforced two of the truisms I ve repeatedly encountered when studying subcultures.
The market will replace your values with its own It seems to me that subcultural movements tend to have certain values to them that make them popular with certain segments of the public As they gain popularity, the mainstream starts to notice them, and tries to find ways to monetize them, even if the movement was one that was based originally around non commercial values This is how we end up with Iggy Pop songs being used to sell Disney Cruise tours, and fashion that exploits women and their sexuality being marketed as girl power feminism It s also how we end up with a generation of computer hackers who can t understand why anyone would want to buy a pre assembled computer with the software already loaded on it.
History never ends One of the main recurring conflicts in Hackers relates to who has access to computer information we see this with the MIT gurus in the 50s trying to limit access to their computers, and again with the tales of early software users wanting to freely share programs vs the companies wanting to use copy prevention to increase their profits And we see the same conflict now with the open source movement vs proprietary software, and DRM media files vs the Creative Commons It s one that will probably continue as long as people are recording information by the bit, which should ensure that Hackers remains somewhat relevant for generations to come.
This book is divided into three basic sections The first, about MIT hackers in the 1950 s and 1960 s, is outstanding The second, about homebrew hardware culture in the Bay Area in the 1960 s and 1970 s, is decent but bloated The third, about game hackers and Sierra On Line, is mostly worthless I d recommend reading the MIT section and then readily giving up on the book after that.
A Mere Fifteen Years Ago, Computer Nerds Were Seen As Marginal Weirdos, Outsiders Whose World Would Never Resonate With The Mainstream That Was Before One Pioneering Work Documented The Underground Computer Revolution That Was About To Change Our World Forever With Groundbreaking Profiles Of Bill Gates, Steve Wozniak, MIT S Tech Model Railroad Club, And , Steven Levy S Hackers Brilliantly Captured A Seminal Moment When The Risk Takers And Explorers Were Poised To Conquer Twentieth Century America S Last Great Frontier And In The Internet Age, The Hacker Ethic First Espoused Here Is Alive And Well Let s get this out of the way up front the term hackers here refers to the original ideology of the word from the earlier days of computing, when hackers blazed the trail of our modern hardware and software systems These are not the modern day denizen hackers of destructive, malicious infamy Based on this understanding, this book should be required reading for anyone connected with the computing profession It serves as a rich history of the genesis of modern day computing, from the earliest days at MIT, the birth of languages such as Lisp and BASIC, the origins of modern video games from Space War and Colossal Cave, to the natural evolution of microcomputing Steven Levy shows us how a historical book about an industry should be written It contains an unfolding, interrelated emotional story of people and technology There are moments of wonder, awe, tenacity, pain, suffering, hope, idealism, and eventually, money, capitalism, and greed Even at 450 pages, this is one book you ll read through quickly After reading this, you ll want to fire up Emacs, dust off Space War, and find out just how powerful this Lisp language from 1959 still really is This was somewhat mediocre The book started ok, with the AI lab in MIT and the hackers there, but then got into some stuff which has nothing to do with hacking in any form, and the focus on Sierra On line is unjustified.
All things considered, not a useful book beyond the first 100 150 pages.
F n awesome, obviously Everyone should have read this by now, or by several years ago rather.


This book is divided into three basic sections The first, about MIT hackers in the 1950 s and 1960 s, is outstanding The second, about homebrew hardware culture in the Bay Area in the 1960 s and 1970 s, is decent but bloated The third, about game hackers and Sierra On Line, is mostly worthless I d recommend reading the MIT section and then readily giving up on the book after that.
This was a really interesting look at the history of computers as a DIY technology, stretching from the 1950s to the 1980s, when the first edition of it was published I find a lot of computer users look at the things like they re magic boxes, likely run by black magic and or hamsters running in wheels I confess to having moments where I ve felt that way myself, but I m trying to educate myself a bit on how computers actually think and operate, and this book helped cement that understanding a bit.
Additionally, this book reinforced two of the truisms I ve repeatedly encountered when studying subcultures.
The market will replace your values with its own It seems to me that subcultural movements tend to have certain values to them that make them popular with certain segments of the public As they gain popularity, the mainstream starts to notice them, and tries to find ways to monetize them, even if the movement was one that was based originally around non commercial values This is how we end up with Iggy Pop songs being used to sell Disney Cruise tours, and fashion that exploits women and their sexuality being marketed as girl power feminism It s also how we end up with a generation of computer hackers who can t understand why anyone would want to buy a pre assembled computer with the software already loaded on it.
History never ends One of the main recurring conflicts in Hackers relates to who has access to computer information we see this with the MIT gurus in the 50s trying to limit access to their computers, and again with the tales of early software users wanting to freely share programs vs the companies wanting to use copy prevention to increase their profits And we see the same conflict now with the open source movement vs proprietary software, and DRM media files vs the Creative Commons It s one that will probably continue as long as people are recording information by the bit, which should ensure that Hackers remains somewhat relevant for generations to come.
Let s get this out of the way up front the term hackers here refers to the original ideology of the word from the earlier days of computing, when hackers blazed the trail of our modern hardware and software systems These are not the modern day denizen hackers of destructive, malicious infamy Based on this understanding, this book should be required reading for anyone connected with the computing profession It serves as a rich history of the genesis of modern day computing, from the earliest days at MIT, the birth of languages such as Lisp and BASIC, the origins of modern video games from Space War and Colossal Cave, to the natural evolution of microcomputing Steven Levy shows us how a historical book about an industry should be written It contains an unfolding, interrelated emotional story of people and technology There are moments of wonder, awe, tenacity, pain, suffering, hope, idealism, and eventually, money, capitalism, and greed Even at 450 pages, this is one book you ll read through quickly After reading this, you ll want to fire up Emacs, dust off Space War, and find out just how powerful this Lisp language from 1959 still really is This was somewhat mediocre The book started ok, with the AI lab in MIT and the hackers there, but then got into some stuff which has nothing to do with hacking in any form, and the focus on Sierra On line is unjustified.
All things considered, not a useful book beyond the first 100 150 pages.
F n awesome, obviously Everyone should have read this by now, or by several years ago rather.